Online-Parent Training to Release Family Stress

Do we experience too much stress in our family?


All families experience stress to some extent. Stress allows the family to develop: parents mature and children to “flourish”. But is this stress excessive? The following test will help you to understand if you experience too much stress in your family life.
 
 
    never some-times often always
  We speak about our feelings.  
  It seems that we have too many rows.  
  I know what is important for my children.  
  (For couples) sometimes our partnership can be very disappointing.  
  (For singles) I like being alone.  
  When we have conflicts the children get angry quickly.   
  We have enough money for important things.  
  We have rows on how much we should spend and on what.    
  Work is very important, but family is the most important thing.  
  We do not listen to each other enough.  
  (For couples) we feel good in our role as parents.  
    never some-times often always
  (For singles) it bothers my children when I have a date with someone.    
  (For couples) our partnership is good and strong.  
  It seems as if someone is always bothered or angry with someone else.  
  (For singles) my children agree with my choice of my dates.  
  I have too much work.  
  We seldom have difficult moments in our family.   
  (For singles) it is difficult for me to be a single parent.  
  The children are good at school.  
  I never have enough time.  
  Everybody in the family has his / her own duties and does them without complaints.    
    never some-times often always
  (For couples) we argue about who should do what with the children.  
  Each day we eat together.  
  It is impossible to make children help.  
  Spending a holiday together would be something wonderful.  
  I was called (i.e. to school) to discuss the behavior of my child.    

 
Please, be sure that you have answered all relevant questions!
Unanswered questioned will be considered to be answered as "ever“.
 

 
Reference:  FindingStone Counseling Centers.



© 2003, 2006 by Yves Hänggi et al., University of Fribourg, Switzerland.